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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 101-107

Early experience with penetrating keratoplasty in South-South Nigeria: Initial audit of indications and outcome


1 Marion Eye Centre, Marion, Illinios, USA; Zerah Eye Hospital and Laser Centre, Calabar, Cross River State, Nigeria
2 Department of Ophthalmology, University of Calabar, PMB 1115; Department of Ophthalmology, University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria
3 Zerah Eye Hospital and Laser Centre, Calabar, Cross River State; Department of Ophthalmology, University of Calabar, PMB 1115; Department of Ophthalmology, University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria
4 Department of Ophthalmology, University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria
5 Zerah Eye Hospital and Laser Centre, Calabar, Cross River State; Department of Ophthalmology, University of Calabar, PMB 1115, Department of Ophthalmology, University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria
6 Zerah Eye Hospital and Laser Centre, Calabar, Cross River State; Department of Ophthalmology, University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Nigeria
7 Zerah Eye Hospital and Laser Centre, Calabar, Cross River State; Department of Ophthalmology, University of Uyo, Uyo, Akwa Ibom State, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Ernest I Ezeh
University of Calabar, Cross River State/University of Calabar Teaching Hospital, Calabar, Cross River State
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ais.ais_44_18

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Background: Corneal diseases are major causes of severe visual impairment and blindness in developing countries, unfortunately. Keratoplasty, which is a major treatment modality, is either nonexistent or at its infancy in these climes. Indications for penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) and the short-term success and survival rates vary in different geographical locations. We sought to evaluate the indications and short-term success rates of penetrating keratoplasty (PKP) in a Nigerian Private Practice Setting in South South Nigeria. Patients and Methods: It was a retrospective audit of 12 patients that had undertaken PKP in the hospital by December 2017. Data obtained from medical records included demographic information like age and sex. Others included preoperative diagnosis, indications for surgery, and pre- and postoperative best corrected visual acuity (BCVA) of subjects. Other information included intraocular pressure pre- and postoperatively, levels of corneal clarity, presence of other ocular comorbidities, and documentation of preoperative graft failure risk assessments. All patients in the series had optical penetrating keratoplasty, performed by a single experienced surgeon for purpose of vision restoration. Results: The mean age of the patients was 50.1 years, with a standard deviation of ± 15.5 years. The indications for PKP were bullous keratopathy seven (58.3%) and five corneal scars (41.7%). The etiological distribution was six patients with pseudophakic bullous keratopathy, one patient was postuveitic bullous keratopathy, three patients were postinfectious corneal scar, and two patients were postmeasles adherent leucomatous corneal scar. Pre-PKP 10 patients (83.4%) were corneal blind on the affected eye and the corneal clarity grades were 2 patients (16.7%) in grade 0, 7 patients (58.3%) in grade 1, and 3 patients (25.0%) in grade 2. At 6 months post-PKP, three patients (25.0%) remain blind in the affected eye, two patients (16.7%) in pre-PKP blind category moved to SVI, one patient (8.3%) with SVI and five patients (41.7%) with blindness at pre-PKP had respectively moved to MVI, and one patient (8.3%) with MVI at pre-PKP had regained normal vision. At 6 months post-PKP, corneal clarity improved from grades 0–2 to grades 3 and 4, in 25% and 75% of the patients, respectively, compared to the pre-PKP grades 0, 1, and 2, in 16.7%, 58.3%, and 25.0% of patients, respectively. Conclusion: In this study, bullous keratopathy and corneal scar were the main indications for penetrating keratoplasty. The short-term (6 months) success and survival of corneal grafts were reasonably good.


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