Print this page Email this page
Users Online: 1593
Home About us Editorial board Search Ahead of print Current issue Archives Submit article Instructions Subscribe Contacts Login 
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2018  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 132-138

A clinical profile and outcome of patients with acute pancreatitis: A prospective study in North India


Department of General Surgery, Shri Guru Ram Rai Institute of Medical and Health Sciences, Dehradun, Uttarakhand, India

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Neha Jindal
Department of General Surgery, Shri Guru Ram Rai Institute of Medical and Health Sciences, Dehradun - 248 001, Uttarakhand
India
Login to access the Email id

Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/ais.ais_3_19

Rights and Permissions

Background: Acute Pancreatitis (AP) is an inflammatory process. The average mortality rate in severe AP approaches 2%–10%. Gall stones and alcohol abuse account for 70% of cases of acute pancreatitis. Almost all patients have acute upper abdominal pain. Systemic complications and multi organ system failure may develop. Patients and Methods: A prospective study conducted from November 2016 to December 2017 in Shri Guru Ram Rai Institute of Medical and Health Sciences, Dehradun, India, in patients who were diagnosed to have acute pancreatitis. A total of 54 patients were enrolled in the study out of which four patients had left against medical advice. The data collected were evaluated to see the outcome. Results: Majority of patients 22 (44.0%) were in age group ranging from 41 to 60 years. Males were dominant (58%). The most common etiology was alcoholism followed by gall stone. The majority of patients were found with abdominal pain (100.0%). The majority of the patients were having moderate Balthazar CT Severity Index (CTSI) (54.0%). In all, 43 patients were having pancreatic complications and pancreatic necrosis was the commonest; 31 developed extra-pancreatic complications, among which pleural effusion was the commonest. Some patients were having multiple complications. The duration of hospital stay was highest in severe group of Balthazar CTSI. Rise in total leucocyte count, serum amylase level and low calcium levels were significantly associated with increase in pancreatic/extra-pancreatic complications. There was only 1 (2%) patient who died and remaining 49 (98%) patients were discharged. Conclusion: Most common etiology of acute pancreatitis was alcohol consumption (50%) followed by gall stones (32%). Increases in total leucocyte count, serum amylase level and low level of serum calcium were significantly associated with increase in pancreatic/extra-pancreatic complications leading to higher morbidity and hospital stay. Patients with higher Balthazar CTSI were having higher morbidity.


[FULL TEXT] [PDF]*
Print this article     Email this article
 Next article
 Previous article
 Table of Contents

 Similar in PUBMED
   Search Pubmed for
   Search in Google Scholar for
 Related articles
 Citation Manager
 Access Statistics
 Reader Comments
 Email Alert *
 Add to My List *
 * Requires registration (Free)
 

 Article Access Statistics
    Viewed532    
    Printed25    
    Emailed0    
    PDF Downloaded45    
    Comments [Add]    

Recommend this journal