Archives of International Surgery

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2018  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 16--20

Oral and maxillofacial soft tissue reconstruction using local flaps in Sokoto, Northwest Nigeria


Abdurrazaq Olanrewaju Taiwo1, Ramat Oyebunmi Braimah1, Adebayo Aremu Ibikunle1, Micah Olalekan Gbotolorun2, Mike Adeyemi2, Benedict Chukwuma1, Siddiq Abubakar1 
1 Department of Dental and Maxillofacial Surgery, College of Health Sciences, Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto, Nigeria
2 Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Dr. Ramat Oyebunmi Braimah
Department of Dental and Maxillofacial Surgery, Usmanu Danfodio University Teaching Hospital, Sokoto
Nigeria

Background: Owing to the aesthetics and functional concern, oral and maxillofacial soft tissue reconstruction requires meticulous planning with team approach. The aim of this paper is to present our experience in the use of local flaps in the reconstruction of oral and maxillofacial defects. This was a retrospective study of maxillofacial and oral soft tissue reconstruction using local flaps. Patients and Methods: The study was carried out in the Department of Dental and Maxillofacial Surgery, Usmanu Danfodiyo University Teaching Hospital in northwest Nigeria over a 4-year period. Data such as age, sex, diagnosis, types of flaps used, complications and prognosis were collected and analysed with the IBM SPSS Statistics for windows Version 20 (Armonk, NY: IBM Corp). Results: Forty-two out of 64 cases of oral and maxillofacial soft tissue reconstruction (65.6%) met the inclusion criteria for local flap utilisation. They consisted of 27 (64.3%) males and 15 (35.7%) females, with a male:female ratio of 1.8:1. Age ranged from 6 to 72 years with mean ± SD (24.2 ± 17.7). Temporomandibular joint ankylosis (TMJA) release was the main reason for soft tissue flap utilisation as an interpositional material in the maxillofacial region 30 (77.3%). Temporalis myofascial flap 19 (45.2%) was the commonest flap used. Most of our cases had no associated complications 39 (92.9%), only 2 (4.8%) patients had total flap failure. Conclusion: Where free tissue transfer is not feasible, local flaps remain a viable option. Good patient selection is essential to prevent some of the complications associated with their use.


How to cite this article:
Taiwo AO, Braimah RO, Ibikunle AA, Gbotolorun MO, Adeyemi M, Chukwuma B, Abubakar S. Oral and maxillofacial soft tissue reconstruction using local flaps in Sokoto, Northwest Nigeria.Arch Int Surg 2018;8:16-20


How to cite this URL:
Taiwo AO, Braimah RO, Ibikunle AA, Gbotolorun MO, Adeyemi M, Chukwuma B, Abubakar S. Oral and maxillofacial soft tissue reconstruction using local flaps in Sokoto, Northwest Nigeria. Arch Int Surg [serial online] 2018 [cited 2020 Jul 12 ];8:16-20
Available from: http://www.archintsurg.org/article.asp?issn=2278-9596;year=2018;volume=8;issue=1;spage=16;epage=20;aulast=Taiwo;type=0