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ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2016  |  Volume : 6  |  Issue : 2  |  Page : 111-114

Age at first pregnancy among primigravidae attending antenatal clinic at a Tertiary Hospital in Kano


Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Bayero University Kano/Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano, Nigeria

Correspondence Address:
Rabiu Ayyuba
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Bayero University Kano/Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano
Nigeria
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/2278-9596.194984

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Background: The first pregnancy marks a transition into motherhood and influences the number of children a woman bears throughout her reproductive period, and consequently the size, composition, and future growth of the population in a community. The aim of this survey was to determine the average age at first pregnancy among primigravidae attending antenatal clinic in Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital, Kano. Patients and Methods: This was a retrospective study among women who booked for antenatal care at Aminu Kano Teaching Hospital over a 1 year period. Data were retrieved from case files and analyzed using the Statistical Package for the Social Sciences, version 17 (SPSS Inc., Chicago, IL, USA). Result: The mean age at first pregnancy was 23.9 ± 4.27 years. Teenage women accounted for 10.2% of the total population. Majority of the women were Hausas (71.8%), Muslims (86.1%), unemployed (80.9%), and had formal education (92.4%). Ethnicity (Hausas versus other tribes), religion (Islam versus Christianity) and occupation (employed versus unemployed) were not statistically associated with the age at first pregnancy above teenage age group (X2= 2.578, P = 0.108; X2 = 1.788, P = 0.181; X2 = 3.350, P = 0.067, respectively). However, formal education was statistically associated with average age at first pregnancy (X2= 13.486, P = 0.001). Conclusion: The age at first pregnancy was found to be 23.9 ± 4.27 years. This was within the recommended age of 20–35 years. Women with formal education were more likely to delay the age at first pregnancy until after teenage years. Formal education will certainly contribute to reducing maternal mortality and morbidity associated with teenage pregnancies.


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